Parking Enforcement Industry News and Announcements

ARTICLES & PRESS RELEASES (Click on title to view full article)

07/29/2015 MobileNOW! and Complus Data Innovations Integrate
08/02/2013 Proactive On Parking
02/16/2013 Tracking down RR parking scofflaws
12/7/2012 Paying day fees, tickets for RR parking goes high tech
2/27/2012 Unpaid Parking Tickets Add Up in Villages
2/8/2012 Port’s parking fees add up
1/15/2012 Ticket scofflaws owe cities $4.2M
12/13/2011 Valparaiso parking ticket payments go online
7/13/2011 Dobbs Purges Old Parking Tickets
4/29/2011 Westport Parking Tickets Get New Look
4/4/2011 Every ticket tells a story in Saugus
10/21/2010 Parking laws pay off for Albany
10/19/2010 Albany cashes in as parking tickets fall
10/18/2010 PGDC to switch ticket management company
8/24/2010 Real-Time Parking Enforcement System Installed in New Canaan
6/8/2010 Poughkeepsie to Double Citation Revenue with CDI System
4/28/2010 Albany, NY-Tracking Tickets, WITH VIDEO
4/28/2010 Albany unveils new parking system
4/27/2010 New parking ticket system in Albany expected to boost collections
1/22/2010 City of Ann Arbor Adds Credit Card Payments to CDI Handhelds
11/10/2009 Complus Data Introduces Industry-First Technology
8/2/2009 [Poughkeepsie] Parking fine? You can pay online
6/30/2009 Binghamton – City issues 50% more tickets in ’09
6/3/2009 City of Duluth and the University of Minnesota-Duluth Choose CDI
4/30/2009 Parking tickets are going unpaid
3/26/2009 A top-10 list no one wants to be on in Wellesley
2/18/2009 Parking tickets made easy for Binghamton police
1/8/2009 New Haven, CT – Parking Ticket Booty Up 14 Percent
1/5/2009 Complus Data Innovations Providing More Efficient Technology
11/13/2008 Complus Data Announces Enforcement Interface with Parkeon
10/29/2008 Complus Data Innovations Unveils Latest Parking Enforcement Tool
9/30/2008 Complus Data Innovations Experiences Rapid Growth
8/19/2008 16,000 parking tickets issued
7/31/2008 Digital Payment Technologies Announces Real-Time Interface with Complus
7/31/2008 Bath, NY: Goodbye to yellow tickets
7/29/2008 Complus Data Pitches In Support for Troops in Iraq
7/29/2008 Complus Data Unveils Real-Time Handheld Interface with DPT Pay Stations
7/29/2008 Complus Data Innovations Announces New Service
7/29/2008 Complus Data Innovations Secures First Airport Client
7/29/2008 Spa City scanning the scofflaws
6/13/2008 Complus Data Innovations Delivers 1,000th Handheld Ticket Writer
6/13/2008 City of Saratoga Springs Gets Big Revenue Boost with Complus Program
10/30/2007 Elmira to expand online payments
11/16/2006 Agency’s technology helps Athens collect from unpaid tickets
5/2/2006 New CDI Website
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07/29/2015
MobileNOW! and Complus Data Innovations Integrate
Streamlining Parking Enforcement at Riverside Community College District
July 29, 2015

MobileNOW!, a global technology innovator and world’s first mobile payment solution for parking and Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (Complus), a national leader in parking management solutions, are pleased to announce a real-time interface to ease enforcement at California’s Riverside Community College District (RCCD).

"At Complus, we understand and embrace the fact that the business of parking is a complex and inter-dependent enterprise," said Amie Devero, Complus’ Vice President of Business Development. "In order to provide our clients with the most seamless and responsive service, we consistently integrate our solutions with technology partners. It is with that commitment in mind that we have completed an enforcement/citation-writing integration with MobileNOW!’s system, and are pleased to report that RCCD is now enjoying greater productivity and ease-of-use as a result of this partnership, and we expect the same of other shared clients in the near future."

In 2014, RCCD adopted MobileNOW! to boost parking convenience and revenue on each campus. Students, faculty and visitors may pay for parking using the free MobileNOW! app, or by calling a local phone number using the MobileNOW! interactive voice response system.

MobileNOW! payment and transaction data is available in real time to RCCD campus enforcement officers using Complus provided handheld devices and parking enforcement application. Parking enforcement personnel will now be able to view up-to-the-minute information on their handheld ticket writer, resulting in more efficient parking enforcement.

“We are thrilled to integrate with Complus, and we believe this partnership will assist in our mission to enhance convenience for our customers at RCCD,” said John Oglesby, MobileNOW! President and CEO. “This seamless integration will create myriad efficiencies for parking management on all campuses through making enforcement quicker, easier and reducing human error.”

In addition to RCCD, the City of Bethlehem, PA has recently selected Complus as their parking ticket management provider and will commence integration with MobileNOW! in the coming months.

Link to Press Release

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08/02/2013
Proactive On Parking
Fairfield Citizen
by Genevieve Reilly
February 16, 2013

City Council Taking Many Steps To Deal With Downtown
Parking has been a hot topic in City Council this year.

Numerous resolutions have been passed to do everything from expand metered parking in the downtown Jamestown area to the establishment of an administrative tribunal to help deal with the roughly $300,000 in unpaid parking tickets.

The most recent resolution that was passed extended the city’s contract with Complus Data Innovations Inc. until April 30, 2016. CDI, a company that is based out of Tarrytown, provides parking ticket services to the city, including data management and the handheld devices used by parking enforcement officers.

“This is our second contract with Complus,” said Jim Olson, city clerk. “They provide the software that we use here in City Hall and the handheld devices that the parking enforcement officers use. The software that they provide is what we use to go in and check the status of tickets. It’s worked very well so we felt that it was important to stay with the same group.”

As part of the contract that the city has with CDI, the company is paid 14 percent of the total parking ticket collections during the period of the contract. Between 2007-11, the city averaged roughly $219,000 per year in revenue from parking violations. For 2013, the budget included an estimated $210,000 in revenue from that source. This means that if the budget is correct CDI will be paid roughly $30,000 for their services in 2013.

According to Olson, from a reporting standpoint, he and city Comptroller Joe Bellitto felt that the price was justified.

“They provide us the handhelds,” Olson said. “If there’s any type of maintenance issue, they take it and send us a new one, and they re-up the handhelds for every contract. I think the cost is warranted for the amount of information that we get.”

The previous company that the city contracted with required the city to purchase their own handheld units for parking enforcement officers.

Olson also said the handheld devices that are provided by CDI help parking enforcement officers to better track delinquent tickets.

“On the handhelds, there’s a screen that pops up to let us know if someone has more than $150 in unpaid parking tickets,” Olson said. “The city code allows us to either boot or tow the vehicle, at that point.”

If a vehicle is booted or towed, the owner must then pay the entire outstanding amount before it will be released to them. That amounts to $50 for booting to have the device removed, or, if the car is towed, it would include all of the charges and impound fees.

The city currently has a contract with Allpro Parking for the two boots that are available.

“When one of the parking enforcement officers is in need of a boot, they call Allpro and it’s put on the offending vehicle,” Olson said. “They attach a sticker to the car to let the owner know that they need to settle the outstanding parking violations, and once the individual has settled the parking tickets, they take the boot off the car. If the boot is still on the car after 4 p.m., though, the boot is removed by Allpro and the car is towed.”

For those with more hefty outstanding sums, there is an arrangement between the city and the city court that allows people with more than $300 in parking tickets to have legal action taken against them.

“The court is good from the standpoint allowing us to do that,” Olson said. “We try to work with the individuals with unpaid tickets and try to work through the court.”

According to Olson, there is roughly $300,000 in unpaid parking violations at this time.

“We try to be aggressive,” Olson said. “People move constantly, and that makes it difficult, but we do our best to get a payment. If an individual signs a payment agreement but fails to pay the city, the corporation council can take them back to court to do whatever they need, including garnishing wages.”

In an effort to ease back on the amount of cases being brought to the city court, City Council passed a resolution earlier this year to establish an administrative tribunal that would oversee parking violations. When the possibility of an administrative tribunal was first approached, Olson explained that the examiners who would be appointed to the council would be required to be practicing attorneys with at least five to seven years of local experience, and that the positions would be volunteer based. Before the tribunal could officially be put into action, however, the home rule requests needed to be brought before the state legislature.

“The measure was passed in the Senate, but unfortunately there was no vote in the Assembly during this session,” Olson said. “We’ll apply again in the January 2014 session, though, and see if Sen. Young and Assemblyman Goodell can help us get the request processed.”
Link to Full Article

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02/16/2013
Tracking down RR parking scofflaws: One owes $9,000
Fairfield Citizen
by Genevieve Reilly
February 16, 2013

New technology is helping track down parking scofflaws at Fairfield’s railroad stations, including one commuter who owes more than $9,000 in unpaid tickets.About two dozen rail commuters without permits have been parking in day-parking spots at the downtown Fairfield and Southport railroad stations, but repeatedly fail to pay the $6 fee, according to town officials.

The largest day-parking amount owed is a $9,000 accumulated bill, which is now being pursued by the town attorney. The fee reflects several years of unpaid fees and fines, officials said, on three different cars registered to Janet Haller of Morehouse Road in Easton. Haller, who is the principal member of Haller Enterprises, LLC, could not be reached for comment.

According to town officials, one of Haller’s cars began accumulating day-parking tickets in 2008 that have not been paid.

To crack down on scofflaws with large unpaid bills, the Police Commission on Wednesday adopted regulations that will allow police to treat parking tickets issued at the train stations just like those issued anywhere else in town.

“It’s not fair to the person who pays and does it the right way,” Commissioner Arthur Hersh said of commuters who promptly pay the $6 day-parking fee.

Now, anyone with more than $250 in unpaid rail day-parking fees will not be allowed to park at either of the two town-managed train stations. If they do, they will be issued a $35 standard parking fine instead of the $6 parking fee and, if the overdue fees remain unpaid, their vehicle could be towed or immobilized by a boot. Day parkers have 10 days to pay the $6 fee before an additional $10 late fee is added.

The scofflaws were discovered when a new ticketing software system was instituted on Dec. 7 by the Parking Authority. Day-parking tickets are printed using the new hand-held devices, which also indicate whether there are any outstanding fees owed by the vehicle’s owner.

Commissioner Norma Peterson asked if changing the regulations will mean more commuters will pay up.

“We have many more mechanisms than the Parking Authority has to collect,” Deputy Police Chief Chris Lyddy said. “We have nearly a 100 percent recovery rate on our side. This would be a step toward that.”

He said that with standard parking tickets police rarely have had to resort to immobilizing a vehicle with a boot to force the owner to pay the amount owed.

Hersh suggested the town notify the state about commuters who reach that $250 threshold so that they cannot simply move over to the new Fairfield Metro depot. The state manages that rail station.

Parking Authority Chairman Ron Pine said local officials would pass along that notification, but it was pointed out that at the Fairfield Metro station, daily fees are collected on the way into the parking lot.

Cindy Placko, the Parking Authority’s manager, said letters have been sent to commuters with unpaid day-parking fees. “Today I got a check for $1,900,” she said.

Previously, envelopes were put on cars for day parking fees and the authority’s older software did not allow the agency to track outstanding fees.

Link to Full Article

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12/7/2012
Paying day fees, tickets for RR parking goes high tech
Fairfield Citizen
by Andrew Brophy
December 7, 2012

Commuters who park at the downtown Fairfield and Southport railroad stations should have an easier time paying for day parking, as well as violations if they get ticketed for parking in a space without the required permit before 9 a.m. on weekdays.Cindy Placko, director of the Fairfield Parking Authority, said Wednesday that Fairfield police officers and special police will use hand-held devices beginning Friday that will issue printed tickets and violations.Commuters will be able to pay the $6 fee for day parking and $35 fee for a violation either online with a credit card or PayPal account or by phone at 866-658-6082.Parking at the Fairfield Metro station is unchanged, as the lots there are managed by the state.Police officers and specials previously had handwritten the tickets and violations, and they could be hard to read in winter or if rain damaged them.”These will all be basically typed or printed,” Placko said of the machine-issued notices.The new tickets and violations also will be downloaded onto the town’s website every evening so a commuter who loses a ticket or violation will be able to find it online. Commuters will no longer have to pay a 50-cent convenience fee to pay online, Placko said.”We’re hoping that they find it more convenient,” she said. “They’ll be able to read it. They’ll be able to use credit cards.”

Mitch Fuchs, a Fairfield resident and member of the Connecticut Metro-North Rail Commuter Council, said he likes the change that lets commuters pay for day parking or violations online with a credit card.

“A credit card makes it so much easier and so much better,” he said. “Being able to use a credit card just simplifies everything.”

Fuchs said he thought the system now in use for paying online, which required commuters to give their bank account information, was too intrusive.

James Cameron, a Darien resident and chairman of the council, also thinks commuters would benefit by having an easier way to pay.

“It sounds like good technology to me,” he said. “It doesn’t necessarily solve the problem of lack of parking at train stations, but if you have a violation, it’s more convenient to pay it online.

“I think, in general, anything that makes parking more efficient and fair is a good use of technology.”

Placko said a Parking Authority survey several years ago revealed that commuters want to be able to pay for day parking and violations with a credit card.

“We did pay attention to the survey,” she said. “It just takes a while to get this moving.”

A total of six hand-held units will be used by police, and they’ll be stored and re-charged at the Fairfield Police Department, Placko said.

Placko said there was no upfront cost for the units. Instead, the company that provides them, Complus Data Innovations in Tarrytown, N.Y., will take a percentage of revenue generated by both day parking and violations. That percentage was not available Wednesday, Placko said, since details of the contract are still being negotiated. She said she hopes that figure is set by the time of the authority’s next meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 12.

Placko said the Parking Authority typically issues from 200 to 250 day parking permits every day, excluding weekends and holidays, which would put annual revenue from day parking at $300,000 to $372,000. That money goes into the authority’s budget for maintenance and operation expenses at the two train stations, she said.

Matt Prohaska, the authority’s communications director, said the hand-held devices also will be able to check a license plate number against a database of people who have been issued permits.

“There will be a search and a full database showing if that car is part of the registered list,” he said.

Police Lt. James Perez said the hand-held units initially would be used only at the two train stations, but could later be used to enforce parking time-limits on Sanford Street and the Post Road.

“The electronic tire marker takes up to three pictures per vehicle if need be,” he said. “If the program succeeds, we’d like to expand it.”

Perez said Complus Data Innovations also can take over sending “late letters” to motorists who have unpaid tickets.

The Parking Authority hopes in 2013 to also work with Complus Data Innovations on its permit system and possibly allow commuters to renew annual permits online, Placko said.

“That’s something we’re working on because right now, all the permits are done through this office, and it’s cash and checks only,” she said.

The Parking Authority’s office is on the second floor of Sullivan-Independence Hall.

Meanwhile, Placko said a canopy above the eastbound to westbound platforms at the Fairfield Railroad Station, including along the Unquowa Road bridge that links them, will be installed and is another feature that commuters said in the survey that they want.

Link to Full Article

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2/27/2012
Unpaid Parking Tickets Add Up in Villages
The Hudson Independent
by Neal Rentz
February 2, 2012

Municipalities are always looking for ways to generate ways to obtain more revenue. One way without burdening property taxpayers is to get outstanding parking tickets paid.In Tarrytown, Irvington and Sleepy Hollow, there are hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid parking tickets.Tarrytown Village Administrator Michael Blau said he did not have statistics for uncollected parking tickets for only 2011, but a recent state audit of the Tarrytown Village Justice Court indicated there are $1,175,580 in parking tickets not paid to the village, Blau noted.Of those unpaid tickets, $841,635 is older than five years, Blau said. “It’s a lot of money,” he said.Blau explained in Tarrytown the fine for unpaid parking tickets increases $5 per month, up to a maximum of $50, in addition to the original cost of the ticket.Tarrytown and Irvington have contracts with the private firm Complus Data Innovations to collect unpaid parking tickets. The company has the ability “to go after people” that the village does not, Blau said. Complus Data, which has had a contract with Tarrytown for a decade, keeps a portion of the unpaid parking fees it collects, Blau noted.Sleepy Hollow village officials also said that parking tickets are a significant source of municipal revenue. Court Clerk Larry Cassidy said 18 percent of the parking tickets issued in Sleepy Hollow have yet to be paid. The village received about $500,000 from parking violators last year, Cassidy said.Sleepy Hollow has been working to get parking tickets paid by hiking the penalties, Cassidy said. The cost of tickets rise in $10 increments for every 30 days to a maximum of an additional $30 over the cost of the original ticket after 90 days, he said.Another way Sleepy Hollow goes after unpaid parking tickets is to deny the renewal of car registration until the tickets are paid for, Cassidy said.

Sleepy Hollow Treasurer Sara DiGiacomo said the village is planning to work with Complus Data to collect unpaid parking ticket fees. “We just signed the contract with them,” DiGiacomo said. “They will be working with a shortly.”

Rather than paying a fee, Complus will receive a percentage of the revenues received from their work getting the unpaid and outstanding parking tickets paid, she said.

DiGiacomo said unpaid parking tickets are costly to the village. “It is a pretty big deal,” DiGiacomo said.

Irvington Village Justice Desmond Lyons said in his village there are currently 6,216 outstanding parking tickets. The value of the unpaid tickets is $234,500, which includes $199,635 in fines; $36,455 in penalties and $1,590 in partial payments, Lyons noted.

In Irvington, the fines for unpaid parking tickets double after the due date, and drivers who do not pay their tickets are subject to having their vehicle registrations suspended, Lyons said.

As part of its contract with Irvington, Complus Data receives a 17 percent commission for getting parking tickets paid, Lyons noted.

“The court mails out parking letters regarding bounced checks, trial notices, partial payments, additional amounts due” (and other pertinent information), Lyons said.

Blau said getting uncollected parking tickets paid is not a problem unique to the three local villages. “It’s an issue for every municipality,” he said.

Link to Article

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2/8/2012
Port’s parking fees add up
By Dyke Hendrickson
Staff Writer
Newburyport News
January 25, 2012

NEWBURYPORT — If collecting municipal parking revenue can be reduced to the crass assessment of “show me the money,” it appears that the city’s paid parking initiative is off to a strong start.In May the city started charging 50 cents per hour to park in off-street lots, and through the end of December it has raised $387,299, according to city officials who responded to a request for a breakdown by The Daily News.Net profit to the city was $158,935, much of which can be considered new revenue because money is coming from lots that were not generating cash in the past.”It appears the program is off to a good start,” said City Clerk Richard Jones, whose office administers the program. “We will continue to tweak the procedures, but essentially, the system is working.”Revenue from city meters was $141,728, and from parking tickets, $181,590.Expense total for the program was $164,383, including an allotment to the Waterfront Trust of $22,500.The revenue from meters at the two lots supervised by the Newburyport Redevelopment Authority was $63,981. The city does not receive the NRA revenue.The city installed kiosks in six municipal lots last May after months of debate. It added about six part-time enforcement officers in time for summer, and even retained several part-time “ambassadors” to stand near kiosks and help arrivals operate the machines.Local residents were generally immune from significant fees: Senior citizens could obtain a parking sticker for free and other residents paid $5. The city dispensed about 7,500 parking stickers.

Some motorists were initially displeased that they had to pay for parking, which for decades had been free in most downtown lots. And some who received tickets for not paying were miffed, though many who marched up to City Hall to complain had their tickets forgiven.

That said, the revenues from infractions ($181,590) was significantly higher than for the same seven-month period the year before ($45,000), according to city officials.

The manner of payment was split evenly among the three methods: coins, bills or credit card. Jones said the Institution for Savings was helpful in the execution of the program, as it purchased an industrial-size counter to process the coins that were collected from the 12 kiosks.

“I am pleased with the program and glad that this is a new source of revenue for the city,” said Mayor Donna Holaday. She said she has been told by ratings agency Standard & Poor that the new revenue stream will be a positive development when the city seeks short-term bonds.

She added, “I have heard from merchants in the downtown that their customers are pleased that they can find spots when they shop, especially in the Green Street lot.”

The most productive month for collections was July, when the following amounts were realized: NRA meter revenue, $14,882, city meter revenue, $25,969 and ticket revenue, $25,606.

One change in the revenue disbursement occurred between the city and the NRA. The city took over the NRA’s lots, which contain about 400 spaces, and installed kiosks.

The NRA had charged cars by the day, often close to $10. On event days, that fee could be $20.

Specific comparisons between the NRA’s revenue from the kiosks and revenues from all-day parking were not available at press time. Three members of the NRA contacted were unavailable for comment.

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1/15/2012
Ticket scofflaws owe cities $4.2M
By Doyle Murphy
Times Herald-Record
Published: 2:00 AM – 01/15/12
dmurphy@th-record.com;abosch@th-record.com

The humble parking ticket starts as a simple problem and builds. Tossed away or “misplaced” by drivers, pushed to the bottom of to-do lists by courts and busy civil servants, parking tickets have quietly grown into nearly mythical piles of uncollected cash for local governments.A Times Herald-Record review of parking tickets in four cities – Kingston, Middletown, Newburgh and Port Jervis – showed that 72,263 tickets have gone unpaid for a total of more than $4.2 million in fees and penalties.The City of Newburgh comprises the vast majority of that amount. Documents show that Newburgh is still waiting to collect on 49,878 tickets totaling more than $3 million.
Parking scofflaws are a problem for our villages, too. Chester reported more than $103,000 in unpaid tickets, and the Village of Liberty was still chasing $171,000. Roughly a dozen other villages surveyed by the Record could not give a dollar amount because officials said they don’t track their parking tickets closely.Unpaid tickets represent a lot of money for governments struggling to pay for basic services, but officials concede that a large portion of those tickets, some dating back to the 1980s, are so old that cities probably couldn’t collect the fees even if they tried.Private contractors step inLocal governments have recently become more sophisticated in the ways they track and pursue parking fines. That is to say, they have begun to hire private contractors who are more sophisticated. For a percentage of the collected fines, contractors will tally the data, track the offenders through motor vehicle records nationwide and, if necessary, leverage scofflaw statutes to motivate reluctant car owners to pay up.Newburgh collected more than $541,000 in parking fines last year, more than triple the $171,000 collected in 2010. City Comptroller Cheryl Gross credits the change to hiring a private contractor at the beginning of the year. Newburgh uses Complus Data Innovations, a Tarrytown-based company, also employed by Middletown, Kingston and a few local villages that also struggle to collect parking fines.
Complus tracks and pursues tickets, and it has also worked on the pile of aging citations, sending letters to any vehicle owners who it can find in old Department of Motor Vehicle records.Municipal officials have difficulty saying exactly how thousands of parking tickets were able to go uncollected in the past. Changing systems, previous contractors who were ineffective, and the sheer amount of paperwork all contributed to the problem.Parking citations are different from tickets issued for speeding or other moving violations. Parking tickets relate to local ordinances and not state laws, which means state courts don’t collect the fines. State scofflaw guidelines allow the DMV to refuse to re-register vehicles that were issued three parking tickets within 18 months. But it’s the local governments’ responsibility to notify the state.

Newburgh has recently begun to report scofflaws through Complus. Kingston and Middletown do the same.
Port Jervis is the only city of the four that does not report scofflaws. It still relies on a collection agency to report unpaid tickets to credit-rating bureaus. The agency also sends warning letters to those who don’t pay.
That strategy – one that used to be employed by the other cities – has gigantic holes. If a parking offender doesn’t need a strong credit score to get loans or a mortgage, he can continue to disregard his parking tickets without fear of consequence. And because the state DMV is unaware, that driver can also continue to re-register his car.

Getting around the fines

Port Jervis City Clerk Robin Waizenegger says people know they can cheat the weak system. Waizenegger said one elderly lady, who was also a huge parking-ticket offender, openly taunted her about the fines.

“I don’t need to worry,” Waizenegger recalled the woman saying. “I don’t need a new car, I don’t need a mortgage – so you people will never get me.”

Meanwhile, Kingston has the toughest defense of all, known as the “boot, tow and scofflaw” program.
Kingston is the only local city that uses the “boot,” a bright orange clamp that locks around one tire and prevents the car from moving. A boot is applied to any car with three or more parking violations, two of which must be 45 days past due. And if a driver doesn’t call within 72 hours to have the boot removed, Kingston tows the car away. Those who call to remove the boot must pay a $40 boot fee and all the tickets they owe. Kingston Comptroller John Tuey believes the boots have forced some drivers to feed parking meters instead of risking a ticket.
“I think there is a certain visibility to the boot,” Tuey said. “It serves as a deterrent.” Still, unpaid parking tickets abound in our cities. Records show some vehicle owners with more than 50 outstanding tickets. Pursuing the biggest scofflaws can be difficult for a number of reasons – vehicle owners switch addresses and license plates, cars are abandoned, people die – but the age of the records might be one of the toughest obstacles.

In Newburgh, for instance, 32,135 of the city’s outstanding tickets were issued more than five years ago. Most of those old tickets in Newburgh and the other cities were recorded without names, relying instead on anonymous license plate numbers as the only identification.

“Realistically, we’ll not be collecting these fines that are years old,” said Gross, Newburgh’s comptroller.

Middletown tax cashier Barbara Carvino said the concern in her city is to enforce laws that keep roads clear and safe, rather than making money. She said Middletown’s revamped system has helped people understand the rules better, but there are still people who rack up violations and ignore citations. “You’d be surprised,” Carvino said. “People think they can just ignore tickets. They think they’ll just go away, but they don’t.”

Turning to the state for help

During the past decade, Newburgh has tried repeatedly and unsuccessfully to win state approval for a tribunal that would handle parking tickets and wipe away its huge backlog. However, the constitutional right to a speedy trial could be an issue in cases in which vehicle owners pleaded not guilty years ago and were never assigned a court date.

“If you don’t have a tribunal, that not-guilty plea just sits there,” said Newburgh Corporation Counsel Michelle Kelson, who also noted the city could have to pay staffing and operational costs for a tribunal.
Newburgh city judges devote a couple of days a month to parking tickets while trying to keep up with the endless flow of regular business generated in a city of high crime. There was even a time in the late 1990s and 2000s when city judges didn’t hear parking ticket cases.

Since 2006, state Sen. Bill Larkin, R-C- Cornwall-on-Hudson, has annually introduced a version of a bill that would allow Newburgh to create a tribunal. The late Assemblyman Tom Kirwan, R-C-Newburgh, was the sponsor in the Assembly. The bill passed the Senate but always stalled quietly when it reached the Assembly’s Committee on Transportation.

“The holdup is (transportation Chairman David) Gantt, who doesn’t even have the decency to return my calls,” Larkin said.

The Times Herald-Record contacted Gantt, D-Rochester, in 2008 and again in December to ask about the bill. He has not responded.
Newburgh resident Barbara Smith became interested in the tribunal bill and said she has called Gantt repeatedly and speaks to an aide each time. “It’s just the continual, continual runaround,” Smith said.
Larkin said Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver could help guide the bill through or possibly steer it to a different committee. Silver also did not respond to a request for comment from the Times Herald-Record.

Cities like Kingston considered the option of a parking-ticket tribunal years ago, but they quickly decided it was not the best route. Tuey, Kingston’s comptroller, warned that a tribunal – with judges, clerks, and extra man hours – could cost more than the old tickets a city would collect.

“You could end up spending a lot of good money chasing down bad money,” he said.

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12/13/2011
Valparaiso parking ticket payments go online
By Jeff Burton jeff.burton@nwi.com
(219) 548-4354
Tuesday, December 13, 2011 3:52 pm

An online payment option might not take away the sting of getting a parking ticket, but it will add convenience in paying fines.
Sgt. Mike Grennes, public information officer for the Valparaiso Police Department, said those issued parking tickets in the city no longer have to pay tickets in person.
A new feature on the department’s website uses technology from an outside vendor that allows people to use credit and debit cards to pay parking tickets.”Hopefully it’s going to make it more convenient for people,” Grennes said.Grennes said by following a link on the department’s website, people can agree to payment terms — and a $3.50 service charge — then enter their ticket number and license plate number to pay parking fines.The $3.50 goes to the company providing the service, he said.
Residents who prefer to pay in person can still do so, he said. The department will continue to take cash and checks as payment during business hours.Grennes said the new program can only be used for parking tickets and not for speeding tickets or other department-issued infractions.Dawn McCulloch, who handles parking enforcement for the department, said technology has been improving accuracy and efficiency in issuing tickets.While she used to put a chalk mark on tires of cars parked downtown, she now uses an electronic pad to enter the license plates along with an automated time stamp and GPS location to ensure drivers aren’t skirting the city’s parking restrictions.Link to Full Article
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7/13/2011
Dobbs Purges Old Parking Tickets
RivertownsPatch
Editor Lizzie Hedrick
July 13, 2011

Got Dobbs Ferry Parking tickets issued before 2007? Most likely, you won’t have to pay them!
Dobbs Ferry’s board of trustees voted unanimously to purge all fines issued before 2007—with the exception of repeat offenders with with more recent violations issued to the same vehicle.
Village Justice Steven Grant precipitated the action, sending the board a letter that stated the cost of attempting to collect the fines was costing the village more than the paid fines could possibly produce.
“Older tickets are almost impossible to collect because so many of those registrations no longer exist,” explained Village Administrator Marcus Serrano.
Since Dobbs Ferry turned the task of collecting fines over to Complus, a private collection agency, Serrano said they had doubled the village’s revenue from parking violations.
“Last year, with only a half-year with Complus, we brought in $102,000,” Serrano said. “This year, we’ve already collected $199,000.”
Though everyone on the board saw the logic in dropping all old tickets, Mayor Hartley Connett said, “If you’ve had the same car since 2007 and have an outstanding ticket, I’d imagine you’ll be very happy with this decision. But I’m sure there are also people in the same situation who recently paid their fines who won’t be.”
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4/29/2011
Westport Parking Tickets Get New Look
Source:www.westportnow.com
Thursday April 28, 2011

There will be a new look to Westport parking tickets and the daily parking fee tickets at the railroad stations beginning Friday.
The Westport Police Department announced today that the present handwritten tickets with built-in envelopes are being replaced with tickets generated by handheld ticket writers.
The computer-generated violation tickets and daily parking fee tickets are part of the department’s new parking ticket and payment system, said Deputy Chief Dale Call.
He said the system by Tarrytown, N.Y.-based Complus Data Innovations, Inc., will allow three images per ticket to document violations and also can be used to electronic “chalk” tires in timed zones.
These innovations will allow more effective enforcement which in turn may help to improve parking turnover in these areas, Call said.
Police officers will still be able to issue handwritten tickets when handheld computers are not available, he said.
The online payment process will also change on Friday with the new online payment site accessed through the town website at http://www.westportct.gov or directly at http://www.parkingticketpayment.com/westport.
The new payment system will accept credit and debit cards as well allow payment through PayPal, Call said.
No additional fee will be charged if railroad parking payments are timely but there will be an additional convenience fee for all parking violations and for late payment of daily parking fees, he said.
The new online payment system will allow customers to see all unpaid tickets issued to their vehicle which is an improvement over the previous system, Call said.
Customers may also make payment by mail or by dropping them off at police headquarters, he said.
The online system also allows customers to contest their parking tickets online in addition to the more traditional paper form which is still available, Call said.
The police official said the new system will also handle reminder notices as well as delinquent collections.
The department is exploring with the company the possibility of using the system to issue rail parking permits which would allow online renewals among other benefits, Call said.
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4/4/2011
Every ticket tells a story in Saugus
Source:www.thedailyitemoflynn.com
Monday April 4, 2011
By: By David Liscio/The Daily Item

SAUGUS – Stephen Sweezey isn’t a story teller, he’s a story listener.
As the town’s sole parking ticket hearings officer, Sweezey spends Mondays at Town Hall explaining the dos and don’ts of state law to often unhappy motorists clutching citations costing up to $300 each.
“I was a police officer in Saugus for 33 years so I’ve heard all the stories before, but people have the right to appeal,” he said, as he sat ensconced behind a desk in a compact room off the lobby.
“If it’s their first offense, I try to cut them some slack. But if somebody has been caught parking in a handicapped space for the third time, well, that’s a different matter.”
Sweezey holds an average 20-30 hearings per week. If Monday falls on a holiday, the hearings are held Tuesday.
According to Sweezey, parking in a space reserved for the handicapped is probably the most egregious offense and punishable by the stiffest fine. Enforcement was more problematic prior to 2001, when the state Legislature enacted a significant change in the way handicapped driver placards are issued. The placards previously had no expiration date.
“People treated them like gold. They were handed down through the generations whether or not anybody in the family was actually handicapped,” he said.
That there were too many handicapped placards in use became evident when the number of complaints from handicapped drivers unable to find a space escalated exponentially.
“The calls went way up. These people were circling round and round the parking lot like a drain but not finding a space to park. All the handicapped ones were taken,” Sweezey said. “Meantime you had more and more placards being issued, due to the graying of American society.”
As Sweezey put it, members of the Baby Boomer generation began entering their golden years, many with health issues causing them to seek placards for handicapped parking privileges.
“Something had to be done, so the placards now have expiration dates. You have to renew them every few years. Some people don’t know that and when they come in here with a ticket for parking in a handicapped zone, they’re holding a placard that’s no good,” he said. “I also get a lot of cases where the person claims they have a placard but left it home while shopping or forgot to display it when they parked.”
Not all excuses are so basic. “We get calls from 75-year-olds who say they can’t find a handicapped space. They’ve been driving around the lot for half an hour and nothing gets them angrier than seeing a car with no placard parked in a handicapped spot, or watching a 26-year-old jump out of his Jaguar after parking in one,” he said. “We had a doctor come in, claiming he had gotten a page on his cell phone and pulled into the handicapped space so that he could make a call. He wasn’t in the car when he got tagged. He said his cell phone had died and that he went into a store to use the phone.”
Sweezey chuckled.
“We had him on camera parking in that space. Earlier that day, he had parked in another handicapped space. We got that one on camera, too,” he said.
It’s hard to argue with a photograph.
“We get people who come in ready to swear on a stack of Bibles they didn’t park in an illegal spot. Then I show them the picture on the computer,” he said.
He noted the town employs two parking enforcement officers who use hand-held citation devices that transmit a photo from the scene to Jackie Howard, the town parking clerk. “A lot of people still don’t know our officers take pictures.”
Miffed motorists inclined to rip up a ticket will have a hard time doing so in Saugus. The new tickets are made of plastic and nearly impossible to tear.
Can’t burn them, either, said Sweezey, holding up a ticket somewhat blackened from flame.”They’re virtually indestructible,” he said.
When Sweezey retired as a lieutenant from the Police Department and took over as parking ticket hearings officer in 2009, the town was just switching over to the hand-held ticketing devices.
“There was a backlog of over 3,000 tickets, so we went back four years and starting trying to collect,” he said. “Today, the scofflaws are cleaned up. If you still owe the town of Saugus, you won’t be able to renew your license or registration at the Registry of Motor Vehicles. If you have five or more tickets outstanding, we will tow your car. Don’t pay your tickets and you’re gonna find your car at the end of a hook.”
It’s no secret parking tickets can be a source of revenue. Town Treasurer/Collector Wendy Hatch said between July 2009 and July 2010 there were 3,029 parking tickets issued. Those tickets generated $297,129 in fines. Between July 2010 and January 2011, the town received another $72,129 in fines, Hatch said.
“The strict program began in January 2009, but the number of tickets decreases as word of mouth spreads,” Hatch said.
Parking in a handicapped spot will likely earn first-time offenders a $100 fine, a break from Sweezey since the law allows up to $300. Other offenses with hefty penalties include parking next to a fire hydrant and in a crosswalk. Violators should know a hearing before Sweezey is a one-shot deal.
“If they agree to a hearing before me, that’s their chance. If not, I direct them to Salem District Court,” he said.
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10/21/2010
Parking laws pay off for Albany
Source: www.timesunion.com
Thursday October 21, 2010

And the good news? Surely there’s a bright side in an Albany budget most notable, suddenly, for a proposed 7.5 percent tax increase, the layoffs of about 34 city workers, substantial cuts in municipal services and the realization that without a radical change in the distribution of state aid, times will get even tougher.There is solace, actually. At least the collection of parking ticket fines and surcharges is up across the city — by some $915,000, or 36 percent, through Sept. 30.Think of the squeeze upon city finances if Albany had continued to maintain a two-tiered system for issuing parking tickets — one for those who have no choice but to pay them, and one for those well enough connected that fines that can approach $100 didn’t apply to them. Tickets for that select group were an invitation to keep parking illegally.Think, too, of how much better off, relatively speaking, Albany would be if it hadn’t lost out on more than a million dollars in parking ticket revenue by issuing at least 57,000 so-called ghost tickets between 2001 and 2008. The exact amount might never be known.This is reform. Albany now has a 21st-century system in place for enforcing the parking laws that are so critical to keep the city running. Parking ticket receipts account for $3.6 million of the $159 million budget that Mayor Jerry Jennings has proposed for next year. Just $3.3 million was budgeted this year. Last year it was $3.35 million.No one likes paying those fines, but ensuring that they’re collected fairly and uniformly is as vital as anything city Treasurer Kathy Sheehan can do to manage the finances of a city struggling with a $23 million deficit. Even the $200,000 or so the city has to give Complus Data Innovations, which provides the computer software for the new collection system, to satisfy its 7.5 percent cut of parking fine receipts is well spent.Oh, and the down side? Yes, there is one, even to the bright side. Albany’s public service officers are actually writing fewer tickets. The decline as of the end of July was about 7 percent compared with the same period last year. Motorists, in turn, owe less than they once did. The cumulative amount of outstanding fines is down about 27 percent.Why? Perhaps there are fewer cars in the city on a daily basis, especially with some state jobs moving out of downtown and up to the W. Averell Harriman State Office Campus.Then, again, perhaps people are being more vigilant about following parking laws now that it’s so much harder to get out of paying tickets.

From scandal to efficiency. It’s a story we’d like to hear more often.

The issue: The city collects substantially more money in fines. The Stakes: If you get a ticket, chances are you have to pay it.

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10/19/2010
Albany cashes in as parking tickets fall
Source: www.timesunion.com
Tuesday October 19, 2010
By: Jordan Carleo-Evangelist, Staff Writer

ALBANY — A year after a parking-ticket scandal roiled City Hall, Albany has collected nearly $1 million more in parking fines and surcharges so far this year — despite the fact that its parking enforcement officers are writing fewer tickets, Treasurer Kathy Sheehan said.The numbers may underscore the inefficiencies that pervaded the city’s old fine-collection system — problems that were laid bare in a series of unprecedented Common Council hearings last summer.State auditors found the city’s tracking of parking violations so murky in some instances that they couldn’t say for sure how much money Albany lost out on by doling out unregulated free parking privileges for years.Overall, collections were up 36 percent, or $915,540, through Sept. 30 of this year, Sheehan told city lawmakers during a Monday night hearing on her office’s proposed 2011 budget.For city coffers, that’s meant about $715,000 more in revenue when you subtract the 7.5 percent that Albany yields to Complus Data Innovations, the company that provided the new software and equipment.”It’s the benefit of having a 21st-century computer system,” said Sheehan, who took office in January and immediately oversaw the implementations of the changes. The process began under her predecessor, Betty Barnette.But the bump in collections belies two other trends: The city’s public service officers, or PSOs, are ticketing fewer cars and the total value of those violations that are written has plummeted.Through July, the total number of tickets written was down about 4,000, or seven percent over last year, and the total dollar value of those tickets was down 27 percent, Sheehan said.Sheehan said the drop in ticket writing is an enforcement issue that she has discussed with police Chief Steven Krokoff, whose department oversees the public service officers.

“I can only collect what’s written,” Sheehan said.

Councilman Daniel Herring speculated that it might be linked, at least in part, to the state moving more workers from downtown offices to the Harriman State Office Campus.

The trend seems to contradict one of the perceived benefits of the new system: That PSOs might actually become more productive because their new hand-held computers would require them to rely less on more time-consuming hand-written tickets.

The city expects to collect about $3.6 million in fines and surcharges next year, up nearly $350,000 from what it collected in 2009 — the first full year after the Times Union revealed that thousands of tickets were being inappropriately issued with no fines whatsoever.

Sheehan said the $3.6 million figure is a conservative projection based in part on the drop in enforcement.

State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli revealed the city issued at least 57,420 no-fine tickets between 2001 and 2008, despite having no clear policy authorizing or governing their use.

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10/18/2010
PGDC to switch ticket management company
Source: Wicked Local Plymouth, www.wickedlocal.com/plymouth
Monday October 18, 2010
By: Emily Clark

PLYMOUTH — The Plymouth Growth and Development Corporation is poised to sign on with a new parking ticket management company. Park Plymouth Manager John Burke is negotiating a contract with COMPLUS Data Innovations Inc., based in Tarrytown, N.Y.The company currently managing the town’s parking tickets is Clancy Systems International, which has been charging the town approximately $28,000 annually for the service. Clancy’s contract with the PGDC expires Dec. 31.Clancy has been the service company for six years, providing meter enforcement officers with meter readers, and following up with delinquent notices and ticket and citation management. COMPLUS does the same work, only the company would provide officers with technologically advanced meter readers that scan inspection stickers, providing information that can be used to access the owner of the vehicle, the address and any outstanding citations through a comprehensive, nationwide registry of motor vehicles connection. Unlike Clancy’s system, officers wouldn’t have to hand write information.”We’re just trying to make the operation a lot more efficient and a lot more effective, and substantially boost the payment of citations,” PGDC President Leighton Price said. “They have a link to all the registries. So, they have access to the most current information on that plate and address.”The benefit, COMPLUS representatives say, is officers can do their jobs faster and more efficiently without having to carry additional equipment like a separate ticket printer, which they must use now. The new COMPLUS meter readers scan inspection stickers, print tickets and detail the time of the entry within seconds. COMPLUS will shoulder the role of processing the tickets, sending out citations and tracking RMV records.”Our staff does all that now, even though we’re working with Clancy ,” Price said. “Currently, we do a lot of manual and computer work with our staff. With COMPLUS, our staff will be able to be out on the street more because we’re farming that service out to COMPLUS.”And, with the faster, more efficient service, enforcement is expected to increase. Park Plymouth is currently at a 75 percent collection rate for parking tickets, Knox said. The PGDC hopes to raise that percentage rate to 90 in the next year-and-a-half with COMPLUS, which boasts 90 to 96 percent collection rates across New England.”When you take the whole picture overall, COMPLUS had more to offer both presently and going forward into the future,” PGDC member Richard Knox said. “We still have to go through negotiations. There were a few things we want to clarify, like what’s included in the overall price. John Burke, our operations manager, will negotiate the contract and get back to us.”Burke has decades of experience in the parking management industry, Price and Knox added, and was instrumental in attracting this top-of-the-line company, which is expected to charge Plymouth approximately the same fee Clancy charged.

“It’s only about $5,000 more and, probably, the net affect is it will cost us less to have this being done by COMPLUS than what it costs by paying Clancy and having our own staff do a lot of in-office work.,” Price said. “There will be more tickets and less processing cost. A reduction in cost should be the net effect.”

Burke sent the service out to bid and received several possibilities. Unfortunately, the Massachusetts company that was also in the running was disqualified because it provided the cost of the service upfront, Knox said. Apparently, the state mandates that the price not be included in the initial bidding process so corporations like the PGDC do not base their decisions exclusively on price.

Copyright 2010 Wicked Local Plymouth. Some rights reserved

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8/24/2010
Real-Time Parking Enforcement System Installed in New Canaan
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, August 24, 2010
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, recently implemented their brand new, real-time parking enforcement system in the Town of New Canaan, CT.The Town’s Parking Enforcement Officers can now use CDI’s wireless handhelds to patrol the downtown area and the Metro North Railroad commuter parking lots. Once a parking ticket is issued, the ticket data uploads to the CDI parking ticket system in real-time. By taking advantage of the Town-wide Wi-Fi network, the Complus handhelds can also download the most up to date repeat offender lists for identification of boot or tow eligible vehicles in the field.CDI states that this solution is also available for use with cellular technology; however New Canaan’s existing Wi-Fi network helped to eliminate the otherwise cost prohibitive aspects of such a solution.As part of the multi-year contract with New Canaan, CDI will provide the handheld ticket writers for parking enforcement, tracking software and delinquent collection services. The contract also includes a complete data conversion from the current system, nationwide DMV lookups and web-based parking ticket payments.”We are extremely pleased to be partnering with New Canaan on this project and look forward to a long and successful partnership,” said Chief Operating Officer Stephen Hittman.About Complus Data InnovationsComplus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 150 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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6/8/2010
Poughkeepsie to Double Citation Revenue with CDI System
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, June 8, 2010
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) has helped the City of Poughkeepsie increase their parking ticket revenue significantly since implementing FastTrack™, their industry-leading parking ticket management system in July of 2009.In just the first 5 months of 2010 alone, the City collected more parking ticket revenue than they had averaged annually. At this pace, full year parking ticket revenue for 2010 is projected to increase over 200%. During this period, ticket issuance has remained fairly steady, with increased revenue due mainly to CDI collecting a higher percentage of both backlog violations and newly issued tickets compared to the previous system. As part of the multi-year contract with the City, CDI is providing handheld ticket writers for parking enforcement and tracking software including training, maintenance and support at no additional cost. Nationwide DMV lookups, delinquent noticing and web-based parking ticket payments for violators are also included as part of the all-inclusive fee.”The CDI system was an upgrade that made sense to the City both technologically and in its potential to help us cut costs and generate revenue,” said Assistant Corporation Counsel Paul Ackerman. Chief of Police Ronald Knapp added, “CDI helped our Department upgrade to new state of the art parking enforcement technology without adding additional costs for annual maintenance and support contracts.””Poughkeepsie looked to CDI to help increase collection rates and generate revenue,” stated Chief Operating Officer Stephen Hittman. “We are proud of our results thus far on this project and extremely pleased they chose our solution.”About Complus Data Innovations Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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4/28/2010
Albany, NY-Tracking Tickets, WITH VIDEO
Source: Fox 23 News, www.fox23news.com
Wednesday, April 28, 2010
By: Cait McVey

With just the touch of a screen, public service officers can now issue and print out parking tickets. All of the information on that ticket is then sent from the hand held ticket writer to a database, storing not only the details of the violation, but also which officer issued the ticket.”There are parts of the system that we hope to be able to use to address the issue of accountability around what was happening in the past,” says City Treasurer Kathy Sheehan.It’s the city’s latest step towards transparency after last year’s ghost ticket scandal. More than 200 people, including police officers and their spouses, were on a VIP list that ensured no-fine parking tickets. The city has since done away with that list. And now, the department says the electronic ticket system will make sure there is no discretion when tickets are issued.”We want to make sure people understand that when you come to this city or you live in this, there is one system and it offers an even playing field for everyone,” says Acting Albany Police Chief Steven Krokoff.A system the everyday driver says is only fair.”Absolutely,” Thornton says. “Why should it be any different.”Link to Full Article
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4/28/2010
Albany unveils new parking system
Source: Times Union, www.timesunion.com
Wednesday, April 28, 2010
By: Carol DeMare, Staff writer

A new citywide system for issuing parking tickets and collecting fines has taken effect, effectively bringing to a close a parking-ticket scandal that plagued City Hall for months after it was reported that special parking privileges were given to people with connections, officials said Tuesday.The new high-tech system intends “to enhance transparency and improve enforcement of the city’s parking regulations,” Treasurer Kathy Sheehan, who oversees the Parking Violations Bureau, and acting Police Chief Steven Krokoff announced in a statement. The new procedures are “fully operational,” they said.At the core is a software system that “links computerized handheld ticket writers directly to our collections database,” Sheehan said. “This allows us to track every ticket from the time it is written until it is ultimately paid or dismissed. New safeguards also allow us to protect against unauthorized changes.”The Police Department and its officers’ union came under fire for so-called ghost tickets. In 2008, the newspaper reported on the longtime practice of secret tickets containing “bull’s-eye” stickers — carrying no monetary penalties — issued to private vehicles of city police, spouses, friends and city-employed civilians. These stickers were placed on windshields so vehicles could park on city streets without fines or penalties.Records showed a total of 57,450 ghost or voided tickets over the last eight years amounting to $4 million in lost revenue, the Times Union reported. Then-Treasurer Betty Barnett came under fire during an investigation into the ticket irregularities, and she lost her bid for re-election last year.The Police Department and Sheehan’s office worked with the Albany Parking Authority “to evaluate our options for parking enforcement,” Krokoff said in the statement. Complus Data Innovations was selected for “depth of experience, as well as integrating (its) parking ticket management systems in municipalities, particularly in New York state.”Besides providing enhanced audit capabilities, the system has automated collection notices for delinquent unpaid tickets.”We expect to see a significant increase in collections over the next several months,” Sheehan said. The Westchester County software company “has demonstrated collections of up to 96 percent for newly issued tickets and up to 80 percent for backlogged, unpaid tickets,” she said.Complus is not a collection agency, she stressed. “We will continue to adjudicate and enforce our own tickets, but with our new enhanced database, we will be better able to pursue enforcement efforts, particularly against scofflaws.”

Complus provides handheld ticket writers, which include bar code scanners to be used by parking enforcement officers, allowing them to scan state registration stickers. The city is working with the Parking Authority to provide scanning capability on parking meters, which will also reduce data entry.

“In addition to improving productivity, our new handhelds should enhance our enforcement capabilities,” Krokoff said. “Each ticket writer has built in imaging capability, which allows us to capture up to three digital images of a violation. While not all violations require digital imaging, a picture of a blocked driveway or fire hydrant will assist in any additional court proceedings.”

The city installed and started testing the new software system at the end of March, and the handheld ticket writers went into service last Friday, the officials said. The Parking Violations Bureau will provide quarterly reports to the Common Council of the number of tickets issued, fines collected and tickets dismissed, they said.

At the direction of Mayor Jerry Jennings, the city’s Law Department, working with police officials, Sheehan’s office and the Parking Authority, issued a request for proposals last August for municipal parking management services and related equipment. In February, Complus was awarded the contract as the most qualified bidder and began working with city officials.

The software company has worked with Saratoga Springs on ticket collections since 2007.

Jennings recognized Assistant Corporation Counsel Michelina Wojton for her work, with others, on the contract “which we believe will bring transparency and effective management to the parking violation and collection process.”

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4/27/2010
New parking ticket system in Albany expected to boost collections
Source: CBS 6, www.cbs6albany.com
April 27, 2010 12:53 PM
By: Michelle Kim

The city of Albany is tightening enforcement of its parking ticket system with the help of a new software program that is expected to more closely track tickets that are issued and ultimately boost revenue collections.The program, by Complus Data Innovations, tracks every ticket from the time it is written until it is ultimately paid or dismissed through a computerized database, according to city treasurer Kathy Sheehan. The new system also automates collection notices for delinquent unpaid tickets.Parking enforcement officers will be issued new handheld ticket writers that include bar code scanners connected to the New York State vehicle registry, which is expected to reduce manual data entry.The handhelds will also have a built-in camera that allows officers to capture up to three digital images of a violation.”While not all violations require digital imaging, a picture of a blocked driveway or fire hydrant will assist in any additional court proceedings,” said Acting Police Chief Steven Krokoff.”We expect to see a significant increase in collections over the next several months,” noted Sheehan. “Complus has extensive experience in municipalities throughout New York and has demonstrated collections of up to 96 percent newly issued tickets and up to 80 percent for backlogged, unpaid tickets.”Complus was awarded the contract for the city’s parking management services in February as the most qualified bidder, according to Sheehan.The city installed and started testing the new software system at the end of March, and placed the new handheld ticket writers into service on April 23.The Parking Violations Bureau will provide quarterly reports to the Common Council of the number of tickets issued, fines collected and tickets dismissed.

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1/22/2010
City of Ann Arbor Adds Credit Card Payments to CDI Handhelds
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, January 22, 2010
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, is proud to announce the release of a new service. CDI recently installed new Casio IT-3100 handheld ticket writers with integrated magnetic card readers to accept credit card payments for tow-eligible vehicles in the City of Ann Arbor, Michigan.This feature enables City parking enforcement officers (PEOs) to process delinquent ticket payments for tow-eligible vehicles in the field. Prior to this implementation, the City’s PEOs had to carry separate credit card processing equipment to accept these types of payments. Customers with 4 or more unpaid parking tickets to the City of Ann Arbor that are eligible to be towed can now pay the unpaid tickets with a credit card on the PEO’s handheld through the attached magnetic card reader. The customer can then sign for the payment on the handheld’s touch screen and receive a printed receipt from the same device.The City of Ann Arbor also utilizes CDI’s industry-first interface with Digital Payment Technologies’ pay by space meters, allowing officers to toggle between pay by space information, ticket issuance and credit card payments all on the same Casio handheld device.”Ann Arbor wanted their officers to be able to process payments for tow-eligible vehicles in the field without carrying additional equipment,” said Stephen Hittman, Chief Operating Officer. “This functionality, combined with the Digital interface on the handheld, has allowed PEOs to be even more efficient and also offer customers the opportunity to avoid costly towing and impound fees.”About Complus Data InnovationsComplus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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11/10/2009
Complus Data Introduces Industry-First Technology
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, November 10, 2009
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, proudly introduces another industry-first technology. CDI is now offering clients in the State of Massachusetts the ability to scan vehicle inspection stickers using CDI proprietary software with their handheld ticket writers. Massachusetts recently began the practice of utilizing barcodes on their vehicle inspection stickers as part of a major overhaul to the State’s Vehicle Check Program.Scanning the barcode on an inspection sticker allows an enforcement officer to gather vehicle information for parking ticket issuance quickly and more efficiently. Clients benefit by eliminating data entry and keypunch errors during data capture. In addition, a client’s parking enforcement officers will become more productive as less time is needed during the citation issuance process. On a whole, by increasing accuracy and productivity, CDI is helping Massachusetts clients to collect more revenue from this process.CDI has the most extensive client base in Massachusetts and the Northeastern United States of any parking ticket management company in the industry and they have been offering clients barcode scanning of New York State registration stickers for over 15 years. When Massachusetts decided to implement a similar process with their vehicle inspection stickers, CDI quickly responded to their client’s requests to offer a similar service.”Our clients have had great success and fewer ticket issuance errors over the years by using barcode scanning in New York, so this is the next logical step,” said Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “As parking enforcement technology continues to evolve, so will CDI.”About Complus Data InnovationsComplus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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8/2/2009
[Poughkeepsie] Parking fine? You can pay online
Source: Poughkeepsie Journal
By: Michael Valkys
Staff Writer
August 2, 2009

Drivers hit with parking tickets in the City of Poughkeepsie no longer have to pay their fines in person at city hall, or through the mail.In a program city officials believe could be the first of its kind in Dutchess County, drivers can now pay their parking fines online. Those who choose that option will be charged a $3.50 per ticket “convenience fee” on top of their fines.The new system, which debuted two weeks ago, is designed to make it more convenient for drivers to pay their tickets. Officials also hope it increases revenue from parking tickets – many of which go unpaid.”We are enhancing technologies throughout city hall to be able to provide more user-friendly opportunities,” Mayor John Tkazyik said. “This is one opportunity for people to take advantage of.”Tkazyik said no one has used the new online payment system yet, but he hopes drivers will as word about the program spreads.Drivers interviewed outside the post office near city hall had mixed reactions to the online option.Former Poughkeepsie resident Julie Murray, visiting from North Carolina, said she would likely pay parking tickets by mail – and save $3.50.”I would probably go the old-fashioned way,” Murray said.City resident Jim Poonjani said he would use the online system, noting problems could arise for drivers if payments are lost in the mail.

“It’s more convenient,” Poonjani said of electronic payment.

Tkazyik said the city is working with ParkingTicketPayment.com, which is run by Tarrytown-based Complus Data Innovations. Under the arrangement, Tkazyik said the city will pay the company 12.5 percent of ticket revenue generated through the online system.

According to the company, the service allows drivers to pay parking tickets “over a secure Web site with most major credit cards. Once payments are processed … records at the City of Poughkeepsie will be updated accordingly, in real time, and your parking tickets will be marked as paid.”

The online payment method is one of several city initiatives over the past year designed to bolster revenues and crack down on parking ticket scofflaws.

An amnesty program for parking scofflaws was offered last fall as the city forgave accumulated late fees on unpaid violations. Officials estimated more than $100,000 was collected as drivers paid their initial fines.

Before the amnesty began, officials said Poughkeepsie was owed more than $1 million in unpaid parking tickets from the previous several years.

Officials last year also announced police would aggressively target vehicles owned by drivers with six or more unpaid parking tickets. Police use a portable license plate scanner to identify scofflaw vehicles on city streets and in municipal parking lots. Such vehicles are then impounded.

The Common Council last year hiked administrative fees for such violations from $50 to $75. Storage costs for impounded cars were increased from $10 to $20 per day.

Meanwhile, the mayor said the city is exploring other ways technology can make life easier for residents.

Tkazyik said officials are working on programs that would eventually allow residents to pay water, sewer and tax bills online as well.

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6/30/2009
Binghamton – City issues 50% more tickets in ’09
Source: pressconnects.com, Great Binghamton
By: By John Hill
Staff Writer
June 30, 2009

Ramped-up efforts to issue parking tickets in Binghamton have led to a nearly 50 percent jump in citations this year. Figures provided by the city show 8,329 tickets were issued in the first five months of the year, compared with 5,624 during the same time last year.New this year are hand-held digital ticket writers, purchased by the city in hopes the speedy devices would increase parking revenue. Mayor Matthew T. Ryan credited the gadgets for the boost in ticket-writing.”It’s clear that Complus has improved parking enforcement city-wide,” Ryan said.Those ticketed probably aren’t happy, but for Binghamton, which is facing a budget crunch and approaching a state cap on the amount it can charge its residents in property taxes, any increase in revenue is welcome.The city had collected $179,055 in parking fines as of May 31 and is on track to exceed last year’s collections, which totaled $311,484. Those amounts correspond to fines collected in a particular time period, not those tickets written during that time. Most parking violations carry fines between $20 and $40.While city spokesman Andrew Block said enforcing parking regulations, improving traffic flow and keeping vital parking spaces open for businesses was the ultimate goal, he acknowledged the cash isn’t bad either.”It’s part of a total effort (to enforce parking laws), and it does bring in additional revenues, which is a benefit,” Block said.Parking enforcement officers have scored heavily downtown, where most of the city’s parking meters are situated. Jim Delaney, owner of Chenango Point Cycles on Susquehanna Street, said enforcement has soared since the Binghamton University Downtown Center opened in 2006. At least three cars outside his establishment were ticketed Monday for expired meters.New York-based Complus Data Innovations has provided the city with five hand-held parking ticket scanners, software and technical support in exchange for 12.5 percent of every fine collected. City officials said they believed the devices, which spit out tickets in about 15 seconds, would more than pay for themselves.

But other issues seem to be at work, as well. Closure of the subterranean garage at Government Plaza has driven hundreds of government workers onto surface lots and parking ramps.

The city employs two parking enforcement officers, one full time and the other part time. Both are outfitted with the new devices.

Parking officer Tom Ryder said the Complus system is much faster delivering tickets. But he thought other factors, such as the closure of government plaza’s garage, were more responsible for the large increase in tickets.

“There’s a lot more cars that are sitting around because they can’t go in there,” Ryder said.

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6/3/2009
City of Duluth and the University of Minnesota-Duluth Choose CDI
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, June 3, 2009
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, has implemented their fully outsourced solution in the City of Duluth, MN and the University of Minnesota-Duluth (UMD). This move was prompted when St. Louis County, MN (who had formerly processed the parking tickets) gave the City and University one year’s notice to find another option for ticket processing.In the spring of 2008, St. Louis County informed all of the area police departments and cities that they would soon stop handling parking ticket processing. While this decision would impact 24 local cities and colleges, 9 out of every 10 parking tickets in the County were issued in the City of Duluth or at UMD. After reviewing different options for handheld ticket writers and back end services, the City of Duluth and UMD chose CDI to provide their full service parking ticket management solution. For both agencies, the CDI solution includes handheld ticket writers with integrated printers and image capture, tracking software, nationwide DMV lookups, delinquent noticing, payment processing, data entry of handwritten tickets, and online payments for violators.”CDI was a cost-effective and comprehensive solution. There were zero up front costs to the City, and maintenance and support are included. That combined with CDI’s ability to improve our collections helped us to choose the Complus program,” said Lieutenant Robin Roeser of the Duluth Police Department. Lt. Roeser added, “CDI provides the hardware, the software and the ticket processing functions that St. Louis County used to provide. Now we have one vendor for everything.”About Complus Data Innovations Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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4/30/2009
Parking tickets are going unpaid
Source: Wicked Local, Saugus
By By: Mike Gaffney
Thu Apr 30, 2009, 07:52 AM EDT

Saugus – A plan is in the works to contract with a private company to collect tens of thousands of dollars in outstanding parking ticket revenue.Article 22 on the Town Meeting warrant requests authorization to pay a company to collect fines for parking tickets issued in town.Since last July, Canine Control Officer Harold Young and Angelo Serino have written more than $250,000 in parking tickets, according to Bisignani.But to date Bisignani told the Advertiser the town has collected less than 20 percent of the $250,000 it is owed in fines.”We’re writing a lot of tickets, but people aren’t paying them,” Bisignani said.Young and Serino simply don’t have the time to process all of the parking tickets and to issue payment demands, Bisignani explained.Serino works as a part-time employee, Bisignani said, while Young splits his duties between animal-related calls and writing parking tickets.To effectively handle all of the paperwork in-house requires hiring additional staff. As an alternative, Bisignani has proposed partnering up with a company called Complus Data Innovations to administer the issuance of parking tickets and the collection of fines.Bisignani noted Complus has a solid track record of working with a host of communities that include Newton, Wellesley, Bedford and Northampton.

Under the proposed arrangement, Complus would provide every police cruiser and parking enforcement officer with a handheld computer device on which parking violations are recorded.

On a regular basis officers would turn over the parking ticket information to Complus for processing, Bisignani said.

At that point Complus steps in by issuing payment demands and notifying the Registry of Motor Vehicles about individuals who fail to compensate the town for their violations.

Complus makes a profit by charging $5 for each ticket that it processes. But Bisignani asserted the town stands to take in considerably more revenue through the partnership because the average parking ticket carries a $50 fine.

Bisignani contended that empowering Young and Serino to write parking tickets has helped address a serious problem that plagued neighborhoods.

With the Police Department severely shorthanded, a creative plan was necessary to resolve the numerous complaints that come in for people parking in handicapped spots and blocking fire lanes, Bisignani said.

“The money is nice but public safety is the main reason for doing this,” Bisignani remarked.

Revolving fund nixed

Originally Bisignani hoped to establish a revolving fund for the purpose of collecting and expending revenues from parking ticket violations.

But the Finance Committee questioned the legality of depositing fines from parking tickets into a revolving fund. Bisignani ultimately decided to go another route after counsel for the Department of Revenue advised against creating such a fund.

As an alternative Bisignani said the plan is to offer an amendment on the Town Meeting floor to pay Complus for its administrative services out of collected parking fine receipts.

Town Meeting member Peter Manoogian said the DOR communication clarifies that revenues generated from parking tickets shouldn’t go into a revolving fund.

“It’s clear that it isn’t a purposeful use for a revolving account,” Manoogian said, stressing the money for contracted services should be spent in a way that allows Town Meeting members sufficient oversight.

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3/26/2009
A top-10 list no one wants to be on in Wellesley
Source: Wicked Local, Wellesley
By By: Elana Zak/Townsman staff
Thu Mar 26, 2009, 10:01 AM EDT

WELLESLEY – Wellesley’s 10 worst parking-ticket offenders have one thing in common, according to town records. None actually live in Wellesley.Wellesley’s parking clerk, Bonita Legassie, and her team gave out more than 25,000 parking tickets last year. The men and women who owe the most — anywhere from almost $2,000 to $600, according to a list provided by Legassie — are not residents, but people who work in town, Legassie said. Their records show some of them have been collecting parking tickets in town for almost 15 years.”Believe it or not, it’s either store merchants or [their] employees,” Legassie said. “Many of these are hairdressers.”In fiscal 2008, Wellesley raked in more than a half-million dollars from parking tickets alone. That number doesn’t include the money the town gets from all the change put into the various parking meters around town. In January, more than 1,900 tickets were issued. For this fiscal year, the town is looking to get more than $500,000 again in parking tickets.”We have a really good team of parking attendants,” Legassie said. “They are very well trained and do their job well. They have to constantly keep traffic moving all the time.”From Jan. 1, 2008, to Dec. 31, 2008, 27,174 parking tickets were issued. Of those, 16,757 were paid on time while 6,599 were paid late and 2,189 remain unpaid, according to data from Complus Data Innocations Inc., the company that compiles the town’s parking violation information.Five parking meter attendants patrol downtown Wellesley and the other metered areas in town. Holding handheld machines, they can easily give a ticket by simply putting in the car’s information and pressing print. Parking meter attendant Patrick Ryan said in a normal day, he gives out around 80 tickets.”Most of the people are nice,” said Ryan, who has worked in the town for five years. “[Some] tear [the tickets] up and refuse to take them. I just pick [the ticket] up because it’s already recorded in the computer.”While parking tickets might be the bane of some drivers’ existence, Legassie does lower the fine or void the ticket entirely if the parking meter offender appeals the ticket. Legassie dismisses more than 2,000 tickets per year. Last year, she reduced almost 1,600 ticket fines. Yet, as many can attest, it isn’t an easy feat to get rid of that ticket.

“You don’t void too many tickets,” Ryan said. “I just tell them [the ticket is] already written. Once it’s written, there’s nothing I can do.”

In a few weeks, residents will notice some new parking meters in the parking lots around town. These new machines will accept credit cards (Visa and MasterCard) and have receipts showing the date they expire.

Neighboring cities and towns, such as Cambridge and Brookline, are experimenting with even newer meter technology, including those that are solar powered. Legassie said those meters aren’t on Wellesley’s horizon, at least for now.

“There’s talk about it,” Legassie said. “I don’t foresee it happening, not for a couple of years.”

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2/18/2009
Parking tickets made easy for Binghamton police
Source: News 10
http://news10now.com/content/all_news/133911/parking-tickets-made-easy-for-binghamton-police/Default.aspx
February 18, 2009
By: News 10 Now

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. –The hand-held digital parking ticket device is the latest tool in the law enforcement’s arsenal. It’s a piece of technology that’s very simple to use.”They’re kind of idiot proof. What they do is scan the registration, it gives us a read out and it’s just a matter of us entering one section and bang, the ticket is printed,” said Herb Simonds Jr. with the Binghamton Police Department.Its simplicity seems to only be matched by its effectiveness. The city is expecting the device to help raise parking ticket revenues by $75,000.Tickets can be issued much faster by machine than by hand. In the past the weather played a factor in lost ticket revenue, but not anymore.”There’s times when you know it’s zero degrees out. You’re trying to write tickets, the pens aren’t writing well, maybe the description of the car wasn’t legible and at that point if they get to court or something like that, it could be dismissed, where all this is printed out computer perfect,” said Simonds.The machine also shows the officer how many tickets are owed to the vehicle. If that number is three or more, they may put a wheel boot on the car.The digital devices also come with a camera, which police can use to take a shot of how and where a car is parked and like the other features of the machine, it eliminates a lot of the confusion.””Very legible, everything is right here. There’s no guessing or tickets getting mutilated. They’re all nice and printed out. You can’t tear it, you can stomp in it, throw it on the ground, whatever you want and it’s kind of indestructible,” said Simonds. CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO CLIP

Copyright(c) 2/18/09 06:45AM News 10 Now

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1/8/2009
New Haven, CT – Parking Ticket Booty Up 14 Percent
Source: New Haven Independent
http://www.newhavenindependent.org/archives/2009/01/parking_ticket.php
January 8, 2009
By: Melissa Bailey

The city’s new campaign to track down parking ticket scofflaws — including the owner of this FedEx truck — appears to be paying off.The FedEx truck was booted in November for owing about $2,000 in parking tickets, according to city transportation chief Mike Piscitelli. Within a few hours of having the wheel immobilized, the company came in and paid its tab.Thanks to new collection tactics, city traffic officials raked in an extra $165,232 in parking ticket revenue in the first quarter of this fiscal year compared to FY07-08. That’s a 14 percent increase, according to a report from the city’s budget director.”It was a pretty good quarter,” said Piscitelli. The flow of cash came at a time when the city needs it: Departments are facing a spending freeze, and city workers are being forced to choose between concessions and layoffs.The new funds aren’t a result of more ticketing, Piscitelli said: “Ticketing has not increased substantially in any way compared with last year.” And in a recession, parking downtown is down a little bit.What’s driving the department’s success, he said, is a new collections procedure.The city contracts with Complus Data Innovations of White Plains, N.Y., to collect outstanding parking tickets. The company gets a cut of whatever it collects, so it’s incentivized to do a good job.This year, the city has directed Complus to step up the number of letters it sends to delinquent payers. The city used to send out letters 10 days after a parking ticket is issued, and another one after 20 days. It didn’t have a method for sending out letters after that. Now the city’s got a system in place: Send letters after 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, 120 days, then after one year and then annually thereafter.That means the city’s sending 7,000 letters a month, where it used to send about 5,000, Piscitelli said. In addition to the letter blitz, the city’s checking more frequently with the state Department of Motor Vehicles for address changes.

“The early results are promising,” Piscitelli said. Also adding to the revenue flow are the city’s relatively new, steeper fees: Tickets double after 15 days, then triple after 30 days. If outstanding tickets total $200, a driver may see a red boot clamped to his wheel, and bright stickers slapped on the window.

The new method is sending the city one steady stream of revenue at a time when others are dribbling due to a recession.

The spike in collections will likely flatten over time, Piscitelli said. But if the city continues to reach more scofflaws, it hopes to settle at a higher rate.

“We’re pushing to a higher plateau of collections,” he said. “Everyone owes. The idea is to make sure everyone pays.”

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1/5/2009
Complus Data Innovations Providing More Efficient Technology
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, January 5, 2009
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, is now offering new clients web-based access to their proprietary FastTrack™ parking ticket management software. Throughout 2008, all new client installations were set up using Citrix web-based thin-client technology.Citrix web-based access to FastTrack™ allows clients to use the software without installing the application on their PCs. Using a web browser, system users simply sign in to Citrix with a unique user ID and password and then securely access the Complus FastTrack™ application online. The Citrix environment allows most maintenance and support to be handled remotely, which creates faster response times to IT-related issues. “The migration to thin-client technology has streamlined our entire implementation process,” said Stephen Hittman, Chief Operating Officer. “Providing web-based access to FastTrack™ has also virtually eliminated the need for on-site software support and maintenance issues, freeing up valuable IT resources for implementation and training.”About Complus Data Innovations Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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11/13/2008
Complus Data Announces Enforcement Interface with Parkeon
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, November 13, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, is proud to announce the availability of an interface between CDI handheld ticket writers and the multi-space parking management system of Parkeon, the global and American leader in on-street parking solutions.The combination of Parkeon’s wireless, web-based Parkfolio application and the wireless communication capabilities of CDI’s handhelds, will allow parking enforcement personnel to view real-time pay station information on the CDI handheld ticket writer. Enforcement personnel can view valid or expired space information on the handheld device, and then toggle directly into the ticket issuance screen as necessary – ultimately resulting in a more comprehensive and efficient parking enforcement solution and better payment compliance among pay station end-users.To ensure up-to-date payment data is displayed on the handheld, Parkeon’s Enforcement application first polls all meters in the area for up-to-date payment data. Then it maintains an “always live” connection during enforcement so that, no matter when or from where a motorist might pay, that information is immediately forwarded to the Enforcement Officer’s handheld. This helps ensure accurate citations and decreases in-court disputes.”Parkeon is pleased to offer clients and prospects of both Parkeon and CDI this unique interface,” says David Palmer, Marketing Director – North America for Parkeon. “Integrating allied technologies, such as handhelds and citation management, into a seamless system is the future of parking management.””For potential customers who already have Parkeon pay stations, this represents a unique benefit for us to be able to offer to them,” commented Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. Hittman also added, “Parkeon is a firmly established company in the parking industry and we look forward to working with them on future installations.”About Complus Data Innovations Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.About Parkeon Inc Parkeon has nearly 40 years experience delivering multi-space parking management solutions. Globally, our systems control over 3 million parking spaces in more than 3,000 cities and 40 countries. We have 200 clients in North America alone. Our parking solutions can increase revenue, improve parking occupancy and flow, and decrease maintenance and collections costs. Our meters offer Pay & Display and Pay by Space deployment, extreme solar power efficiency, and your choice of payment options (e.g. coins, bills, credit card, smart card, cell phone). Our sophisticated management software allows for wireless two-way communication, offering immediate remote download of rate and message changes as well as real-time credit card authorization. For more information, please contact us at 800-732-6868 or visit us at www.parkeon.com.
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10/29/2008
Complus Data Innovations Unveils Latest Parking Enforcement Tool
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, October 29, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, is now offering new and existing clients the latest in handheld technology from Casio. Updated with enhanced features and a new look, the Casio IT-3100 is the next generation of an already reliable parking enforcement staple—the Casio IT-3000. The new Casio has an upgraded operating system for more robust development capabilities and a newly-designed LCD display for improved visibility in all lighting conditions. The IT-3100 also features an updated color scheme on the outer case and keyboard, while retaining the same sturdy construction to withstand rough handling and inclement weather conditions.The IT-3100 offers the same essential parking enforcement attributes from the IT-3000, including image capture, barcode scanning capabilities and standard integrated high-speed thermal printer for one-piece convenience. As part of CDI’s comprehensive parking ticket management system, the Casio IT-3100 is the latest handheld technology for efficient and reliable parking enforcement.”The IT-3100 represents exactly what our client base is looking for,” said Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “It’s a single-piece unit that is lightweight, user-friendly and a highly effective parking enforcement tool. Part of our goal at CDI is to offer our clients the best overall handhelds available to the parking industry, and this new unit certainly reflects that commitment.”About Complus Data Innovations Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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9/30/2008
Complus Data Innovations Experiences Rapid Growth
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, September 30, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, is proud to announce a period of rapid growth and expansion, unparalleled in the company’s history. During the last five years, CDI’s client base has grown by nearly 70%, representing a presence in nine new states for CDI. With this recent expansion, CDI now has over 140 clients in 18 states. Throughout this stage of growth, CDI has offered new products, new services, and entered new markets in response to burgeoning demand for their parking ticket management services.CDI Chief Operating Officer Stephen Hittman commented, “As market demand for new parking enforcement products and services expands, CDI will continue to extend our reach to help meet that demand. Whether it’s a new handheld offering or a completely new market—we are always willing to adapt in order to offer the most comprehensive parking ticket management solution available.”About Complus Data Innovations Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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8/19/2008
16,000 parking tickets issued
By Jeff Starck Wausau Daily Herald August 19, 2008
Wausau officers issued more than 16,000 parking tickets last year, a 71 percent increase from the previous year, according to a newly released report.The 16,453 citations in 2007 compared with about 9,600 the year before, according to the annual Wausau Police Department report. City police and parking control officers went from writing an average of 26 tickets a day to 46 daily last year.Citations ranged from $5 for an expired parking meter to $30 for blocking a fire lane.

More officers on the streets and a greater awareness of parking issues led to the increase, said Wausau Traffic Lt. Dennis Saager. The department hired a second parking control officer in 2007, and the new officers often train during third-shift hours, when parking violations are common, Saager said.

In addition, the department began using higher-quality hand-held computers that can process the tickets more efficiently.

Jim Janke, co-owner of Janke Book Store on Third Street, said he wasn’t aware so many tickets had been written. A person who violates the rules by parking in a stall all day can deter other potential customers from shopping at downtown businesses, he said.

“If our customers are bothered by it, they haven’t said anything,” Janke said of the tickets.

Other statistics from the report show:

  • Violent crime increased from 108 cases in 2006 to 110 cases in 2007. Robberies increased almost 48 percent to 31 in 2007, but aggravated assaults were down 16 percent from 2006.
  • Property crimes were down 15.7 percent from 2006, with 1,125 cases in 2007.
  • Drug arrests made by the Police Department were down significantly in 2007 — 169 arrests in 2007 compared with 202 arrests in 2006 — largely because of a drop from 90 arrests to 55 arrests for possession of drug paraphernalia.

But the Marathon County Sheriff’s Department Special Investigations Unit, which includes two Wausau officers, nearly doubled its arrests in the city of Wausau from 65 to 125. Arrests for manufacturing or delivery of drugs also showed a big jump, increasing from 45 arrests in 2006 to 81 arrests in 2007.

“We started seeing more drugs, and we had a more concentrated effort to interdict,” said Sheriff’s Lt. Gary Schneck, who leads the Special Investigations Unit.

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7/31/2008
Digital Payment Technologies Announces Real-Time Interface with Complus
Souce: T-Net (www.bctechnology.com)
Friday, June 13, 2008
Vancouver, BC

Digital Payment Technologies, a manufacturer of multi-space parking pay stations and online management systems, and Complus Data Innovations, a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, have teamed up to provide wireless integration between DPT’s LUKE parking meter and CDI’s handheld enforcement devices. The partnership was unveiled at last week’s International Parking Institute Conference (IPI) in Dallas.The integration enables municipalities, universities, and private parking operators to capture real-time information about paid and unpaid parking spaces in Pay By Space operations. The benefits include increasing the efficiency of enforcement officers, raising the accuracy in citation issuance, reducing customer service issues due to false citations, and positively impacting the environment with the elimination of paper-based reports.”We are thrilled to offer this new capability to current customers already utilizing DPT pay stations,” said Stephen J. Hittman, CDI Chief Operating Officer. “Payment compliance and efficient parking enforcement are crucial to our customers’ bottom line. Anything we can offer to impact revenue in a positive way is welcomed by our customer base.” Hittman also noted: “Going forward, this will present tremendous advantages for both Complus and Digital as we continue to grow and search for new business opportunities.”The integration between DPT parking meters and CDI’s enforcement devices was made possible by DPT’s Web Services application. DPT Web Services provides the tools required for third-party technology companies to pull real-time data for DPT’s Internet-based management system, Enterprise Management System (EMS). Additional applications can include the automated delivery of transaction information into parking operation accounting systems and the customized reporting in association with in-ground parking space sensor systems. DPT Web Services was launched in October 2007 and DPT expects there will be a significant growth in integration demonstrations over the next year. Cities like Milwaukee, WI, and Fredericton, NB, have already developed their own custom applications using the software platform.”Technology integration was a theme at last year’s IPI, but very few companies in the industry were actually demonstrating how it could work,” stated Chris Chettle, DPT’s Vice President, Marketing. “We are very excited to work with CDI to deliver a tangible example of how industry players can work together and deliver expanded benefits to our mutual clients.”About Digital Payment Technologies Corp.
Digital Payment Technologies is an innovative leader in the design, manufacture, and distribution of electronic parking meters, management software, and online services for the multi-billion-dollar parking industry. The company’s products provide complete financial tracking, control, and reporting on parking revenue collected by cities, municipalities, universities, parking management companies, private operators, and national parks, from customer payment through to bank deposit. In 2007, DPT was named Emerging Company of the Year by the British Columbia Technology Industry Association. In the same year, DPT placed on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 50 and Fast 500 lists for the second consecutive year as one of the fastest growing high technology companies in Canada and North America.About Complus Data Innovations
New York-based Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the US, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes on-site training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure Web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.For more information, please contact:
Chris Chettle, Vice President Marketing
Digital Payment Technologies Corp.
(604) 688-1959 extension 240 chris.chettle@digitalpaytech.com
OR
Dave Holler, Director of Business Development
Complus Data Innovations
(914) 747-1200
davidh@complusdata.com
OR
Steve Campbell,
Campbell & Company Strategies
Vancouver, B.C.
(604) 888-5267
scampbell@campbellpr.bc.ca
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7/31/2008
Bath, NY: Goodbye to yellow tickets
Source: The Courier
by Rob Price

BATH – The Bath Police Department last week won approval to outsource the processing of parking tickets in a development Chief David Rouse said would save the village $40,000 a year.Tarrytown-based Complus Data Innovations Inc. is expected to begin managing the police department’s fine collections in the fall, Rouse told The Courier after Bath village trustees unanimously approved hiring the company for $1,000 per month.Rouse noted the local police department will continue writing parking tickets.All subsequent activity, however, will be handled by Complus, including scofflawing individuals who fail to pay parking fines. Rouse said scofflaw sanctions may also be extended against individuals who fail to pay parking fines prior to the initiation of Complus services. “If you have any late parking tickets, come in a take care of them,” Rouse said.Individuals who believe they were issued an improper parking ticket may protest in court, Rouse added. “This will not negate anybody’s due process,” he said.The move to engage Complus’ services development after village officials earlier this year decided not to replace veteran dispatcher Connie Holmes when she retires next month. Rouse said the work of processing parking tickets would be too much for the remaining two dispatchers to handle.”When tickets come in, one dispatcher has to run the license plate numbers through DMV,” Rouse said.”Another dispatchers takes care of collections, and another sends out late notices. It’s quite time consuming. I can’t expect two people to pick up the work of a third.”Once Complus takes over the management of fine collections, area residents will notice a few changes when their vehicles are ticketed. For one, the yellow parking tickets will disappear. Rouse said a slip of paper containing violation and fine data would be left under a windshield wiper. It may be possible to pay parking fines on-line, he added.

Complus provides similar services to the cities of Corning and Elmira, Rouse said.

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7/29/2008
Complus Data Pitches In Support for Troops in Iraq
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, July 24, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, has been doing their part to ensure that US troops stationed in Iraq are able to enjoy some of the comforts of home—even while they’re 6,000 miles away. As a special thank you to our troops, Complus employees have “adopted” several battalions, and have been putting together care packages filled with snacks, toiletries, DVDs, music, books, and other sundries not readily available to those actively serving in the Armed Forces overseas.These packages are then sent to the men and women that proudly defend our country abroad. A recent e-mail from one of the soldiers on the front lines stated, “It’s getting rough and this is why we are all grateful for your contribution of support to the soldiers. Not sure how we can repay you. Thanks for all you do and God bless.” Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer, commented, “It’s our small way of helping and we’re glad to provide some comfort and relief to these brave individuals.”For more information about how you or your organization can help support our troops, please contact the USO or visit www.uso.org.

Thank you to all of our troops, both home and abroad.
Our thoughts and prayers are with you.

About Complus Data Innovations
Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.

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7/29/2008
Complus Data Unveils Real-Time Handheld Interface with DPT Pay Stations
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, June 18, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

CDI and DPT officially announced the jointly-developed technology at the International Parking Institute’s (IPI) 2008 Conference and Exposition in Dallas, Texas. Utilizing DPT Web Services capabilities and the CDI-designed handheld application, IPI conference attendees were able to view real-time pay station information on the CDI handheld ticket writer. Parking enforcement personnel will now be able to view up-to-the-minute information on their handheld ticket writer, resulting in better payment compliance among pay station end-users and more efficient parking enforcement for the municipal or university customer.
“Technology integration was a theme at last year’s IPI, but very few companies in the industry were actually demonstrating how it could work,” stated Chris Chettle, DPT’s Vice President, Marketing. “We are very excited to work with CDI to deliver a tangible example of how industry players can work together and deliver expanded benefits to our mutual clients.””We are thrilled to offer this new capability to current customers already utilizing DPT pay stations,” said Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “Payment compliance and efficient parking enforcement are crucial to our customers’ bottom line. Anything we can offer to impact revenue in a positive way is welcomed by our customer base.” Hittman also noted, “Going forward, this will present tremendous advantages for both Complus and Digital as we continue to grow and search for new business opportunities.”About Complus Data Innovations
Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.About Digital Payment Technologies Corp.
Digital Payment Technologies is an innovative leader in the design, manufacture, and distribution of electronic parking meters, management software, and online services for the multi-billion-dollar parking industry. The company’s products provide complete financial tracking, control, and reporting on parking revenue collected by cities, municipalities, universities, parking management companies, private operators, and national parks, from customer payment through to bank deposit. In 2007, DPT was named Emerging Company of the Year by the British Columbia Technology Industry Association. In the same year, DPT placed on Deloitte’s Technology Fast 50 and Fast 500 lists for the second consecutive year as one of the fastest growing high technology companies in Canada and North America.
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7/29/2008
Complus Data Innovations Announces New Service
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, May 1, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, has officially launched their latest service offering to eligible municipalities. A unique agreement with Maryland-based Optotraffic now allows Complus to offer red light and speed violation processing services as part of their overall solution. Over one year of planning has gone into this arrangement and has culminated with the first installation in Edmonston, Maryland.After a violation incident has occurred, Optotraffic’s program will transmit the information to Complus, allowing a municipality to track the data through CDI’s proprietary FastTrack™ Software. Complus also provides nationwide DMV processing and noticing activities as they relate to both the red light and speed violations that occur. Additionally, they have expanded their online payment service to allow violators to pay these violations with their credit card through a fully integrated and automated system. In many states, legislation has already passed or is pending that both allows for and governs this process.”We are looking forward to offering another valuable service to both new clients and our loyal customer base,” commented Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “This service is a natural extension of what we’ve been doing for the past 25 years, which is providing violation processing.” Hittman added, “As with any service enhancement we make, we listen to our clients and provide solutions that will benefit them in the long run while staying within our existing business model.”About Complus Data Innovations
Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.About Optotraffic
Optotraffic provides integrated traffic safety solutions that focus on the engineering and installation of both automated red light and speed enforcement cameras that aim to combat unsafe behaviors in our communities. By deploying proprietary, state-of-the-art, non-invasive detection systems coupled with high-resolution photo and video systems, and complete citation generation services, Optotraffic’s technology helps to ensure the highest exposure and prosecutable rates for these violations, while improving overall traffic safety and reducing the number of motor vehicle accidents. There have been many research studies throughout the United States that have shown the safety benefits of automated enforcement programs.
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7/29/2008
Complus Data Innovations Secures First Airport Client
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, April 28, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, was recently awarded the parking ticket management services contract for Charlotte-Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina. Charlotte-Douglas represents the company’s first airport client.Since 1986, CDI has provided Parking Ticket Management Services to a steadily growing client base of more than 140 municipal and university clients across 16 states. Now, for the first time in the company’s history, an airport will benefit from CDI’s industry-leading customer service and progressive technology.”It’s a very natural extension of what we do,” said Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “Our company is 100% focused on delivering turnkey, revenue-generating parking ticket management solutions…and airports can benefit from this service just as much as any municipality or university.”

“Charlotte-Douglas chose CDI because we needed a solution that would increase our revenue collections while streamlining the entire process more efficiently than we could in-house. We have been very impressed with the level of customer service and personal attention provided by Complus.”
– Eugene Carney, Assistant Aviation Director, Charlotte-Douglas International Airport

Mr. Hittman went on to explain that while there are some fundamental differences in the nature of parking violations that typically occur at airports versus municipal or campus environments, CDI’s offering is easily adaptable to the unique requirements of the airport client. “The entire premise of our FastTrack™ software and “Signature Service” support is to provide a robust solution that is specifically customized to the individual client’s needs. We don’t sell anything off-the-shelf. We always adapt our platform to suit the needs of the particular municipality, university—and now—airport,” he said.

“Our track record of improving collection rates, combined with our promise of zero up-front costs, ongoing no-cost upgrades, on-site training, and new hardware, is a difficult package to pass up,” commented Mr. Hittman. “We are excited to be able to help Charlotte-Douglas achieve its goals.”

About Complus Data Innovations
Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.

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7/29/2008
Spa City scanning the scofflaws
Source: www.poststar.com
By THOMAS DIMOPOULOS
tdimopoulos@poststar.com
Published: Tuesday, July 29, 2008

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Denis Butler has been gazing into parked cars for the past 17 years.”I used to walk around with a chalk stick and a ticket book, but this is much faster,” he said, aiming his electronic ticket-writer at a registration sticker.The sticker was stuck to the front window of a car parked in one of the city’s two-hour parking restricted lots. Butler, one of the city’s three parking officers, reckoned he scans 300 to 400 cars each day and writes between 17 and 20 tickets.The scanner might be faster, but its use hasn’t led to more tickets being written.In the past five years, the number of parking tickets issued in the city has dipped from a high of 16,999 in 2003 to 5,993 for the first half of 2008, on pace for fewer than 12,000 for the year. The decline is a good thing, city officials said.”We interpret that as people following the rules and regulations. With people following the rules of parking, there is more of a benefit for our downtown,” said Public Safety Commissioner Ron Kim. “We want that. Shopkeepers want that. It works all the way around.”But as the number of tickets had fallen, revenue has gone up. The city received $252,000 in parking ticket revenue in 2005, $328,000 in 2006 and $528,000 in 2007, the first full year of service after the city hired Complus Data Innovations Inc.The ticket management company, who also services Glens Falls, Lake George and Schenectady, was hired in December 2006. The city’s collection rate under Complus has gone from 72 percent to 89 percent. The company charges an 11 percent fee for violators in New York and 18 percent for tickets written on cars with out-of-state license plates.Vehicles parked longer than the allowable limit — two hours on most of Broadway and in many city-owned lots — get a $25 ticket plus a $5 surcharge. The surcharge is waived if payment is made in cash. The fine doubles 15 days after it was issued.

Earlier this year, the Public Safety Department began a more aggressive campaign by tabulating a list of 180 license plate holders who owe more than $500 each in ticket fines.

Dubbed the “heavy hitters,” the violators owe the city more than $150,000. The information on their vehicles has been downloaded into the electronic ticket-writers, so Butler is alerted every time he scans the registration of one of the heavy hitters. He makes a call to verify the fines are still outstanding, then calls a tow truck.

In the first few months of the heavy-hitter crackdown, four cars have been towed. Three violators combined to pay $3,185 in back fines and a fourth has made arrangements to pay a reduced amount of $500.

Butler said the most common excuses he hears are that people had only intended to stop for 30 seconds but got held up. Saying they lost track of the day is also a popular excuse, he said. Many two-hour parking locations are restricted only from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Butler, who is difficult to miss in his bright neon yellow uniform, said he often hears a familiar cry when he is standing over a violator’s car.

“They say: ‘Whoa-Whoa-Whoa, don’t do it.’ But once it’s in the computer, it doesn’t come out.”

With the ongoing development of the city, some previously public parking areas, such as the one near the new Hampton Inn, have been lost.

The city’s population is about 27,000, but the need for more parking is especially pronounced in the summer, when a daily average of 30,000 people visit the Saratoga Race Course and as many as 25,000 attend concerts at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center.

Mayor Scott Johnson said recent studies show a need for at least 500 additional spots in the city during peak season. Even more will be required after the Saratoga Springs City Center undergoes an expansion, scheduled to begin early next year and to be completed in mid-2010, he said.

City officials and downtown business owners want crowds to descend upon downtown and ways to expand city parking are being studied.

Traditional parking meters — which Johnson called “unsightly” — are not an option, although a multi-story parking garage with an attractive façade treatment is being considered, Johnson said.

“Our city land is valuable. The only way to maximize the available space that we have is to go up,” said Johnson. He added that he hopes to have a more definitive plan as early as October.

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6/13/2008
Complus Data Innovations Delivers 1,000th Handheld Ticket Writer
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, April 28, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI), a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, deployed its 1,000th handheld ticket writer on September 12th, 2007—14 years since it began providing this innovative technology to customers nationwide. The landmark occasion was shared by their newest municipal client, the City of Sarasota, FL, who received the unit, among others, and now enjoys its benefits.”This is an important milestone for Complus and our customers,” commented Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “In many ways, the handheld ticket writer is a tangible symbol of our core service: state-of-the-art technology that’s user friendly, real-time, and highly accurate, providing a seamless link between enforcement, the back office, and the payment process.”Hittman also noted that, as with all of the hardware and software provided by CDI, the ticket writers were delivered to Sarasota at no upfront cost. “We succeed when our clients succeed,” he said, adding, “We are confident enough in our product and service to know that we don’t need to charge our clients incrementally for the tools that will significantly increase their parking ticket collection rates.”CDI’s current handheld offering, the Casio IT-3000, is a lightweight, durable unit equipped with an integrated high-speed printer and software that connects instantly to CDI’s proprietary FastTrack™ system—the engine behind the CDI parking ticket management solution. CDI’s system allows the parking agent in the field to enter the violation information, print a ticket on the spot, and later perform a simple upload of the shift’s data to the FastTrack™ system housed on new PCs in the municipal office…equipment which is also provided as part of the CDI package.As part of its guaranteed equipment upgrade and replacement policy, the Casio IT-3000 is the 5th different handheld the company has offered over the years. “We guarantee that when we upgrade any of our hardware or software, we will provide it to the client at no cost,” Hittman noted.About Complus Data Innovations
Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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6/13/2008
City of Saratoga Springs Gets Big Revenue Boost with Complus Program
Source: CDI Press Release
Tarrytown, NY, February 21, 2008
Media Contact: Dave Holler, Director of Business Development

The City of Saratoga Springs, NY, reported a 117% increase in parking ticket revenues for 2007— just 1 year after Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) assumed responsibility for the municipality’s parking ticket management services.CDI was contracted by the City in 2006 to address a significant backlog of unpaid parking tickets and to help overhaul the entire parking ticket handling process. Ron Kim, Commissioner of Public Safety for the City of Saratoga Springs, is pleased with the Complus program’s ability to help collect delinquent parking tickets. Kim explained that, “At first we thought we needed a collection agency. However, when bids were received in response to our RFP, we realized that we needed a more comprehensive solution to our needs. That’s what Complus has brought to the table, and it has been demonstrated in the revenue numbers that they have helped us generate.” Lisa Nolan, Department of Public Safety, further stated, “We are very happy with the system. Calls for any service needs are handled professionally and the overall customer service has been A+”.According to CDI, the City’s first year success is common among their newer clients. “As a leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions, we are committed to helping our customers achieve superior results. We pride ourselves on being revenue-generating specialists,” said Stephen J. Hittman, Chief Operating Officer of CDI. “Budgets are tight and municipalities are looking for ways to cut costs and to bring in more revenue to enhance their bottom line.”Under their contract with the City, CDI provides an end-to-end solution that includes handheld ticket writers for automated enforcement, management software, nationwide DMV lookups, and delinquent noticing. CDI also manages the interface between the City and the State of New York to prevent vehicle registration renewals for violators whose unpaid parking tickets meet certain criteria under the State’s guidelines. CDI notes that the City of Saratoga Springs is one of 50 clients that they currently serve in the State of New York.About Complus Data Innovations
Complus Data Innovations, Inc. (CDI) is a recognized leader in the field of Parking Ticket Management solutions. A full service provider of products and services to over 140 municipalities, universities, and airports across the country, CDI offers the proprietary FastTrack™ ticket management software, state-of-the-art hardware including handheld ticket writers, and 24/7 “Signature Service” customer support. The company’s fully integrated suite of products and services also includes onsite training, delinquent noticing, nationwide DMV lookups, TicketView Imaging service, and secure web-based payment capabilities. For more information, visit www.complusdata.com.
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10/30/2007
Elmira to expand online payments
Source: Star-Gazzette.com; Monday October 29, 2007
Author: Ray Finger / rfinger@star-gazzette.com

Excerpt:
Until now, the only Elmira service people could pay online was parking fines, and that only began earlier this year after City Council voted in March to approve a three-year computerized ticket arrangement with Complus Data Innovations of Tarrytown, N.Y.That arrangement has been very successful, and revenue and the number of tickets written have increased since it was implemented, City Chamberlain David Vandermark said.”We generated more tickets, a tremendous amount, because it’s faster and more accurate,” he said. “It’s a hand-held computer, and all they do is scan your registration right on the windshield. That takes all the data off the bar code and prints the ticket, so you can do them in seconds.”As a result, the city is generating about 75 percent more in parking fines, Vandermark said. “If I remember correctly, the number was around $14,000 in the month of September,” he said.Also, by going to online payment of tickets, people are paying more quickly and also are paying their older tickets, Vandermark said.Complus sends out reminder notices to ticketed motorists, he said. Even though the city pays a fee to cover postage, it is generating far more money than if it were still doing parking ticket billing on own — “big time,” he said.Complus also has systems in place to track down drivers and vehicles, even if other municipalities are involved, he said.

Corning uses Complus for its parking tickets and is pleased with the results, City Manager Mark Ryckman said, noting people also can pay their tickets online.”The system works well,” he said. “It is just one of the methods used for collections.”
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11/16/2006
Agency’s technology helps Athens collect from unpaid tickets
Source: Athens, Ohio The Post Online; Tuesday February 28, 2006
Author: Elyse Ball / Staff Writer / eb105303@ohiou.edu

The city of Athens has recovered thousands of dollars in unpaid parking tickets since hiring an independent contractor in June 2005 to recover old tickets, said Athens Police Department Capt. Tom Pyle.Athens City Council passed an ordinance in April 2005 to authorize the hiring of Complus Data Innovations, Inc., which provides the city with computer hardware, software and collection services, City Auditor Kathy Hecht said.Hecht estimated Complus has brought in $60,000 in unpaid tickets to date, but the number will level off as soon as all the back tickets are paid. She said the city estimated parking ticket revenues would be $260,000 for 2005 but turned out to be $336,000 – though she said the unexpected increase was not exclusively because of Complus, which began collecting in July.”It has definitely given us an opportunity to collect big money from outdated tickets and the ability to have updated technology,” Pyle said, adding that those with more than $50 in unpaid parking tickets will not be unable to renew their driver’s licenses under the new system.Athens has signed a three-year contract with Complus, which offered the “cheapest bid (for a service) that had everything we wanted,” said Hecht.In addition to charging a flat fee, Complus keeps a percentage of all tickets collected – 9.5 percent for collection from Ohio drivers and 20 percent from out-of-state drivers, Pyle said. “We’re spending money now, but we’re improving our rate of collections,” he said.Complus has started issuing notices for unpaid tickets from up to two years ago and will look back to issue notices for older unpaid tickets, Hecht said.Complus is able to collect out-of-state tickets more easily because it has contact with the bureaus of motor vehicles in all states, Pyle said. “We used to do that here, and it took considerable man hours,” he said.In addition to collecting money from tickets, Complus has provided Athens’ parking services with a new computer and hand-held devices for entering parking ticket information, Pyle said, adding that the technology will replace APD’s 15-year-old system.

Complus has “innovative ways to collect on tickets,” including a web site where tickets can be paid using a credit card, Pyle said. “It has definitely increased productivity,” he said.

Complus, which is headquartered in Tarrytown, N.Y., works with municipal and university police departments and tailors its services specifically to match a department’s needs, Stephen Hittman of Complus said.

“We perform this service for many cities nationwide, and we’re happy to be serving Athens,” he said.

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5/2/2006
New CDI Website
The new Complus website has been completely re-designed with you in mind. Please take a few minutes to explore who Complus is and what we do. Our services, philosophy, and industry leading technology are explained so that after just a few minutes you will certainly see why Complus is the only full service parking outsourcing specialist for you. Don’t hesitate to fill out the survey on the “Contact” page so we can give you an analysis of exactly what benefits Complus can provide to your Parking Ticket Management process.
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